House of Gold

The Goldbaums’ influence reaches across Europe. They are the confidants and bankers of governments and emperors. Little happens without their say-so and even less without their knowledge. But Greta Goldbaum has no say at all in who she’ll marry.

House of Gold

The Goldbaums’ influence reaches across Europe. They are the confidants and bankers of governments and emperors. Little happens without their say-so and even less without their knowledge. But Greta Goldbaum has no say at all in who she’ll marry.

The Song Collector

With poignancy, lyricism and humour, Natasha Solomons tells a captivating tale of passion and music, of roots, ancient songs and nostalgia for the old ways, of the ties that bind us to family and home and the ones we are prepared to sever.

The Gallery of Vanished Husbands

When Juliet Montague’s husband disappears, so does she. As far as her Jewish community is concerned, she is invisible. Until, on her thirtieth birthday, she does something unexpected.

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‘A delightful, moving, utterly believable family saga’ Kate Saunders, The Times.

‘Natasha Solomons writes like Constable paints and the result is perfect. I absolutely loved this book,’ Katie Fforde.
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‘Charming, mesmerising… a beautifully written tale… Brims with passion.’ The Times
‘This brilliant novel is infused with empathy and humour. I adored it.’ Irish Examiner.

The Novel in the Viola

In the spring of 1938 Elise Landau arrives at Tyneford, the great house on the bay. A bright young thing from Vienna forced to become a parlour-maid, she knows nothing about England, except that she won`t like it.

Mr Rosenblum’s List

Jack Rosenblum is five foot three and a half inches of sheer tenacity and through study and application he intends to become a Very English Gentleman.

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‘A deeply touching and blissfully romantic elegy for a lost world’ – The Times.

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Much of the delight in this novel stems from Solomons’s feeling for types of traditional knowledge that are on the verge of obsolescence. She cherishes old recipes, fading local legends and the evocative vocabulary of the natural world. – The Telegraph